10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin

10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin

I’m sad for you, friend. I’ve had my share of flopped Pinterest pins, too, and it still hurts my heart. After investing all that work, that effort, and all that time on that blog post, you at least want to see some decent results, right? So let’s talk about 10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin.

And then let’s fix it so you can be on your way and crush that blog of yours.

This article contains affiliate links which means I’ll earn commission via your click through or if you purchase something at no extra cost to you.

10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin

Should You Be Aiming For Viral Pins?

Okay, so I know we get stars in our eyes when we talk about viral pins. Our eyes kinda glaze over and we dream of the day our pin finally goes viral.

Is this a thing, like really?

Well, yes. I’ve had a couple viral pins on my Mama Fearless account and it’s a wonderful feeling.

Here’s what I have to say about it.

Landing a viral pin is kinda like winning the lottery, with slightly better odds. Well, okay, much better odds.

Do all the things you know to do to win that viral pin, but instead of always hoping for that viral pin, learn how to create solid, well-performing pins.

The viral pins will come. But for now, it’s those consistent, high-performing pins that become your bread and butter.

They’ll bring you a steady flow of reliable traffic and help you steadily build your blog.

And don’t worry. Like I said, those viral pins will eventually come!

Psst! Share this pin! Thanks for the love!

Pinterest Pins and Blog Traffic

10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin

Let’s talk about how and why your pin didn’t go so well, and then let’s fix it!

1: Not Enough Keyword Research

This one is the most boring of all 10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin, so let’s just get it out of the way.

When you’re creating your pin, you need to have specific keywords in mind that relate to your niche and the topic of your blog post.

The title of your pin should closely match the verbiage on the graphic. It doesn’t have to be word-for-word, but it does need to be pretty close.

Which means the words you choose to put on the actual pin graphic should also contain keywords.

To find out which keywords perform best, go up to the Pinterest search bar and start typing a phrase related to whatever your pin is about. You’ll see several suggestions pop up.

Those suggestions are the most frequently searched in that particular topic. This is a good place to start to discover keywords.

10 Reasons Why Your Pinterest Pin Flopped

2: Poor Description

Not only does the title need keywords, the description does, too. Your pin description should be written naturally in flowing language that is easy to read.

Make sure the top keywords of your blog post are included in that description. You can also include a few hashtags as well.

Don’t go overboard on hashtags. This isn’t Instagram. Pinterest won’t recognize ultra-clever tags and phrases. Just be direct and clear in your phrasing.

3: Bad Quality Image

This one is a biggie.

When you’re designing your pin, you need to be completely sure that the image you’re using is high quality.

Pins with images perform better than those without. So, yes, use an image.

Just make sure it’s crispy clear. If it’s poor quality, that pin is going nowhere.

10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin Good Quality Image vs Bad Quality Image

Use Canva to design your pins. It’s extremely user-friendly and even the free version has nice, high-quality images that you can use on your pins.

4: Too Busy

This is huge.

Images with warm tones and contrasting colors outperform other types of pins. Keep this in mind when selecting an image.

However.

If you select a vibrant image and you plan to design a text overlay (which also performs well on Pinterest), you need to make sure your text overlay stands out.

If your image is so bright and so vibrant that it hurts my eyes, I’m going to keep scrolling.

Keep it balanced.

Refrain from using a bazillion fonts. Stick to around 2 fonts–preferably a display font of some kind and then a Sans Serif font for your minor details. A 3rd font is okay if cautiously–and I mean cautiously–used.

10 Reasons Your Pinterest Pin Flopped

5: Wrong Size

I won’t take a long time here. If you’ve been researching Pinterest pins, you’ve read this a thousand times, I’m sure.

Keep your pins vertical, not horizontal. Pinterest best practices states that pins should have a 2:3 ratio (which means the size should be in thirds, and the length is 1/3 longer than the width).

For 2020, they stated that 1000 x 1500 pixels is the preferred size.

You can get away with longer pins, but keep in mind Pinterest has stated extra long pins will be cut off, ultimately decreasing its performance. If you can find a good length that is eye-catching without getting cut off on a viewer’s screen, that pin can potentially perform well.

Some of my highest-performing pins are 650 x 1260, 700 x 1200, and the classic 1000 x 1500.

Canva makes it very easy to design beautiful pins in any size you’d like.

Try Canva Out for Free

6: Bad Links

Yeah, it’s obvious, I know, but if your pin’s link to your website doesn’t work…

That’s just all bad.

Before you ever publish your pin, always, always double-check the link to make sure it’s complete and actually directs the viewer to the correct place.

10 Reasons Why Your Pinterest Pin Flopped

7: Irrelevant Board

If your beautiful pin is about a healthy lifestyle and you pin it to your “entrepreneurship” board, it’s not going to do well.

Pinning your pin to an irrelevant board confuses Pinterest’s algorithm and significantly impacts your SEO rankings.

Doing this continually will hurt your overall Pinterest ratings.

If you’re struggling to find places to pin your content, just create new, relevant boards.

8: Your Pin is Hard to Read

A Pinterest Pin that Is Hard to Read vs A Pin that Is Easy to Read

Pins with text overlay do well. But we want to be able to read what you’ve written on that pin.

Your pin offers to solve a specific problem. It should attract the eye, and then attract the viewer’s interest.

If the viewer can’t easily read the pin because the font is not the centerpiece of the pin, they’re moving on.

Your text should be large enough to capture the viewer’s attention immediately, without making the viewer fight to get past the image or graphics.

Your image should be either faint enough that the text pops, or the text should be in a solid box that makes it stand out from the pin.

Check out my video on creating an epic Pinterest pin in less than 10 minutes!

9: Bad Timing

Your pin can be perfect, but on Pinterest, timing is everything. Your niche has a particular day or time of day when it’s going to perform the best.

Yeah. Trying to figure that out on your own can get very interesting. And stressful. Let’s not forget stressful

Using Tailwind to schedule your pins will solve that problem. Tailwind has already done the research for you, which means that it knows what time to pin your pin for optimal results.

By scheduling your pins through Tailwind, you’re setting that pin up to go out at the right time for your niche where it will get the most visibility.

Try Tailwind for Free

10: No Brand Identity

If your pin is absolutely gorgeous, but it’s a ghost pin without any sort of identity, well, you’ve just undermined all that gorgeousness.

No Brand Identity on Your Pinterest Pin

People want to know about the brand, company or person that published the pin they’re clicking on.

I mentioned in my article about 15 reasons why Pinterest isn’t working for your blog that your logo is important–in the right place.

Your logo should be somewhere on every pin you post, in a tidy, well-fitting place.

It doesn’t need to take over the pin. Keep it small and out of the way, but easily found so people get to know your brand.

After awhile, people will start clicking on your pins because they recognize your brand. That’s when you’re breaking through the walls and creating trust between your audience and your brand.

Keep Learning

The art of Pinterest marketing is pretty in-depth, but this is a good place to start.

If you’re a beginning blogger all this SEO and Pinterest marketing talk can get overwhelming.

Don’t try to take it all on at once. Just focus on these 10 reasons why your Pinterest pin flopped and start working to improve one thing at a time.

It becomes less confusing as you grow and learn and gain more experience.

Don’t let this intimidate you! If you need some extra help, don’t hesitate to reach out and contact me! I’ll help you any way I can!

Happy hustling!

Thanks for reading 10 Unbelievably Sad Ways You Just Killed Your Pinterest Pin! Check out this post too!

What Your Blog Is Missing And How To Fix It
Let's Be Friends! Follow me on Pinterest!

Author: Elizabeth

My son, Kai, was born in the summer of 2018. My husband and I made the decision that I would leave my full-time job in healthcare to stay home and raise him. It meant a lot of changes, but we are doing it, day by day. Together we are building a business and I've embarked on a new journey creating Mama Fearless, a site to encourage moms to walk fearlessly while pursuing their goals. We are thankful to be able to forge new paths and to keep earning while still focusing on what's truly important--our family, our home, and serving a loving God.